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YOU CAN BECOME A MILLIONAIRE NOT BUYING BOTTLED WATER!
STOP PAYING GOOD MONEY FOR H20. Turns out FAUCET WATER IS FINE!
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I just read pieces and parts of a SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE on the toxins in our drinking water, like FLUORINE and ALUMINUM. It was slightly over my head, a really a lengthy science paper .  It appears that Fluorine interferes with the reproductive system, and aluminum neutralizes fluorine. So puzzling the article that I sent it to my naturopathic MD and asked him if I understood this correctly. Several days passed, and he e-mailed me back. I had it exactly right. Obviously, the destroyers are so eager to kills us, they don't even know  they are neutralizing their own poisons! It seems we have been scammed with all the costly H20. It seems the plenipotentiary characteristic of the 21st century is that ALL PROBLEMS seem to get solved when we throw MONEY at them. THIRST now falls prey to the SPEND-MORE syndrome. Read: http://www.ehso.com/ehshome/DrWater/drinkingwater.php  and here is another article on how NAIVE we are to pay good money for bottled water:

Bottle mania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It

By Elizabeth Royte, Bloomsbury USA
Posted on May 20, 2008, Printed on May 23, 2008
http://www.alternet.org/story/85859/

The following is an excerpt

The outrageous success of bottled water, in a country where more than 89 percent of tap water meets or exceeds federal health and safety regulations, regularly wins in blind taste tests against name-brand waters, and costs 240 to 10,000 times less than bottled water, is an unparalleled social phenomenon, one of the greatest marketing coups of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. But why did the marketing work? At least part of the answer, I'm beginning to understand, is that bottled water plays into our ever-growing laziness and impatience. Americans eat and drink more on the run than ever before. The author Michael Pollan reports that one in three American children eat fast food every single day, and 19 percent of American meals and snacks are eaten in the car. Bottled water fills a perceived need for convenience (convenience without the calories of soda, that is): hydration on the go, with bottles that fit in the palm of the hand, in a briefcase or purse.

According to research conducted by the Container Recycling Institute (CRI), between 1960 and 1970 the average person bought 200 to 250 packaged drinks each year-mostly soda and beer-and many of those were in
refillable bottles. When I was growing up, my family drank only from the faucet and from family-size containers. We quenched our thirst, when out and about, with water from public fountains. Either that, or we waited 'til we got where we were going. On picnics, we might have a big plastic jug of lemonade, homemade. Sure, the grown-ups occasionally bought beer, but the idea of single-serve beverages were considered, by and large,
frivolous.

Today, the tap is just as alien to today's youth, who've grown up thinking water comes in bottles, taps aren't for drinking, and fountains equal filth. Kids like having their hands on a personal water bottle, but they have no interest in washing that bottle out, to be reused another day, or otherwise taking responsibility for their waste.

It's part of my California LOOK!

Stores selling water are on every corner, while drinking fountains or restaurants happy to fill a glass for free are increasingly rare. "As refillables were phased out, as technology developed to enable single-serving plastic bottles, and as industry marketing efforts were ramped up," CRI reports, "packaged beverage consumption grew and grew." The success of portable water in the nineties hinged on the mind-set, established in the seventies and eighties, that it was okay to buy-and then toss-single servings of soda while on the go. In 2006, Americans
consumed an average of 686 single-serve beverages per person per year; in 2007 we collectively drank fifty billion single-serve bottles of water alone. An entire generation is growing up with the idea that drinking water comes in small plastic bottles. Indeed, committed tap-water drinkers are far more likely to be older than devoted
bottled-water drinkers.

Like iPods and cell phones, bottled water is private, portable, and
individual. It's factory- sealed and untouched by human hands-a far cry
from the public water fountain. (Fiji exploits this subliminal
germophobia with its slogan "Untouched by Man," as does a company called
Ice Rocks that sells "hygienic ice cubes"-springwater hermetically
packaged in disposable plastic.) Somehow, we've become a nation obsessed
with hygiene and sterility. Never, outside of an epidemic, have we been
more afraid of our own bodies. Supermarkets provide antibacterial wipes
for shopping cart handles. Passengers bring their own linens to cover
airline pillows. Supermarkets wrap ears of corn in plastic: corn still
in its husk! (The downside, besides mountains of waste, is the
development of super-resistant bacteria immune to most of the commonly
used antibiotics.)

In Consumed: How Markets Corrupt Children, Infantilize Adults, and
Swallow Citizens Whole, Benjamin Barber argues that consumer culture has
turned adult citizens into children by catering to our narcissistic
desires and conditioning us to passionately embrace certain brands and
products as a necessary part of our lifestyles. Is it narcissism that
pulls people into stores the second they feel thirsty? Or is it a need
for emotional succor?

City dwellers walk down the street swigging; they stand in conversation
and mark time with discreet sips. You see it in lines at the movies and
in cars on the freeway. (But only in the United States, Michael Mascha,
the bottled water expert I'd enticed to sample water with me, says. "In
Europe, no one walks down the street sucking on a bottle of water. We
wait and we have a nice meal.") Surely these people have access to water
at the end of their journey and are in no danger of desiccating on the
spot. No, this is water bottle as security blanket.

It doesn't take Mascha, author of Fine Waters: A Connoisseur's Guide to
the World's Most Distinctive Bottled Waters, long to realize he is
walking into the belly of the beast, drinking bottled water with me. On
the phone before we met in person, I admitted I knew nothing about "fine
waters," let alone the cheap stuff. I consumed none of the 27.6 gallons
that the average American drinks annually, and I felt like an
ostentatious jerk buying all that fancy stuff for my meeting with
Mascha.

I'd never even tasted Poland Spring until my first visit with Tom
Brennan [natural resources manager for Nestle Waters North America] in
Hollis, Maine. We'd been talking in that company's conference room when
plant manager Bill Maples swept in bearing swag for all: eight-ounce
bottles of water. I had my own, I said to Maples in what I hoped was a
jocular tone, and pulled out my Nalgene, a wide-mouthed bottle made of
polycarbonate plastic. I'd filled it that morning from a sink in
Yarmouth, Maine, which has excellent water.

Maples handed me a bottle anyway and snapped his open. I unscrewed the
blue top of my Nalgene. In this light, and next to the sparklingly
transparent Poland Spring bottle, my container looked dull and yellow,
like old toenails. The threads in the screw top weren't so clean. Taken
aback, I asked myself, "How old is this thing? And when was the last
time I sterilized it?" The answers were "About a decade" and "Never."

Still, I wanted to make a point. I wasn't a bottled- water customer.
While they drank their company's product, I took a sip of Yarmouth, and
the water tasted fine. Or maybe it just tasted like what I was used to.

The truth is, I didn't want to drink Poland Spring because I didn't want
to like it. I was almost certain it would taste better than Yarmouth
water, which contains chlorine and comes through pipes never visited by
a disinfecting pig. But so what? Foie gras tastes better than chopped
liver. That doesn't mean I'm going to buy it. I don't need to spoil
myself. I don't want to get used to expensive things, especially things
that might, if the treehugger greenies are right, disrupt the social and
environmental order.

I might have been over-intellectualizing this, but I worried that
drinking bottled water would only contribute to an insidious trend. It
was becoming normal to pay high prices for things that used to cost
little, or nothing. Such as television reception (now we have expensive
cable). Or basic telephone service (now we have cell phones). The
shifting baseline means that instead of collectively fighting
problems-such as bad service or bad quality-we accept them and move on:
to the private sector. The city of Baltimore, after fifteen years of
trying to remove lead from public schools' water fountains, in 2007 gave
up and switched to coolers of bottled water.

The environmental writer Bill McKibben calls this movement away from a
sense of common purpose and toward personal enhancement
"hyperindividualism." It puts earbuds in our ears and divorces us from
communal experience; it builds bigger houses and bigger cars, while it
clogs the roads and warms the climate. Hyperindividualism is relatively
new, McKibben writes, "but very powerful."

And while having more personal stuff signals strong economic growth, it
ain't making us happy, according to some economists and sociologists. In
fact, it's increasing social alienation. Hyperindividualism lets those
who can afford to opt out-whether from public schools, mass transit, or
tap water-to further isolate themselves, in style. A 1985 article in the
Financial Times declared that buying bottled water "represents the
exercise of private choice in preference to public provision, which can
seriously be seen as a good in itself." Why? Because public provision
can be inefficient, inadequate, or unhealthy.

I talked to Brennan and Maples for several hours with the Poland Spring
bottle in front of me. The men sipped from their containers and I from
my Nalgene. Finally, like a dieter sitting in front of a popcorn bowl,
I'd had enough: I just had to sample their water. I cracked the top-pop!
I liked that sound; everyone did-and took a careful sip. And you know,
it really did taste good-round and smooth. But, as I said, it wasn't
something I wanted to get used to. I closed the top and set the bottle
aside.

*         *         *           *           *           *           *            *

NOTE: 8 cups of water a day, average adult intake would cost you
8$ a day if you bought a medium priced brand. If you used faucet water
you would have 3,000$ at the end of a year to invest in stocks.

If you had purchased MICROSOFT STOCK on March 14th, 1986
the day of its IPO at 28$ a share, for what that $3,000 represented
in that era, today you'd be a multi millionaire. So kiddo, save your
dollars. On the front of your TSHIRT it should say. MY H20 is CITY
WATER and on the back "I buy blue chip stocks with my savings."
Now, what's better? A house with a pool, Paris vacations or toting
brand new bottled water around and looking like Mr. Monk.

RECIPE FOR MAKING YOUR OWN WATER- I have a huge
Dime Store glass pitcher full of faucet water in the kitchen. I cover it
with a napkin. Chlorine evaporates out of it in about a day
So next day I pour what sat overnight through a BRITTA
pitcher. That takes out impurities, algae. The final elixir is what
I use for tea coffee and lemonade and drinking water. And
MY water is FREE! I can carry plastic bottles around if I want
to look chic. My metaphysical expert Gwenn says to add vibes
to that water by pouring it from glass to glass to aerate it.
My kookie GURU says play Mozart to it, sing and pray over it
the molecules line up like psychdelic art! you can put yours next
to speaker but my cats might knock the bottle over. WHo knows
shocked water might be good for growing hair!
 

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Elizabeth Royte is the author of Garbage Land: On the Secret Trail of
Trash and The Tapir's Morning Bath: Solving the Mysteries of the
Tropical Rain Forest. Her writing on science and the environment has
appeared in Harper's, National Geographic, Outside, The New York Times
Magazine, and other national publications.

PS. SNOPES busts that rumor that the bottles are toxic: SO refill your
costly chic bottles with cheap faucet water. Go on your frugal way
happily! http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/petbottles.asp
 

*   *     *     *     *      *   *     *    *     *      *   *     *     *     *      *   *     *     *     *      *   *     *     *     *

Our POSTER is ANITA SANDS HERNANDEZ, Los Angeles Writer, Futurist and Astrologer. Catch up with her websites  TRUTHS GOV WILL HIDE & NEVER TELL YOU, also The  FUTURE, WHAT'S COMIN' AT YA! FRUGAL LIFE STYLE TIPS,  HOW TO SURVIVE the COMING GREAT DEPRESSION, and Secrets of Nature, HOLISTIC, AFFORDABLE HEALING. Also ARTISANRY FOR EXPORT, EARN EUROS....* Anita is at astrology@earthlink.net ). Get a 15$ natal horoscope "my money/future life" reading now + copy horoscope as a Gif file graphic! No smarter, more accurate career reading out there!

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